HAPPY SAINT DAVID’S DAY! ðŸ’–

So if any of you have been reading my blog for awhile, you’ll remember 5 weeks ago (to the date!) I did a post about the Welsh Valentine’s Day, so I thought it would be fitting to give you all a mini history lesson on what Saint David’s Day is!

So instead of telling you the full story of who Saint David was and what this day is, I shall insert text taken from: http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofWales/St-David-Patron-Saint-of-Wales/ 💖

Disclaimer: These words are not my own and are taken from the website linked above. Credit goes to Ben Johnson who wrote the article. 😊

March 1st is St. Davids Day, the national day of Wales and has been celebrated as such since the 12th Century. Today the celebrations usually involve the singing of traditional songs followed by a Te Bach, a tea with bara brith (famous welsh fruited bread) and teisen bach (welsh cake). Young girls are encouraged to wear national costume and leeks or daffodils are worn, being the national symbols of Wales.

The young David grew up to be a priest, being educated at the monastery of Hen Fynyw under the tutorage of St. Paulinus. According to legend David performed several miracles during his life including restoring Paulinus’ sight. It is also said that during a battle against the Saxons, David advised his soldiers to wear leeks in their hats so that they could easily be distinguished from their enemies, which is why the leek is one of the emblems of Wales!

A vegetarian who ate only bread, herbs and vegetables and who drank only water, David became known as Aquaticus or Dewi Ddyfrwr (the water drinker) in Welsh. Sometimes, as a self-imposed penance, he would stand up to his neck in a lake of cold water, reciting Scripture! It is also said that milestones during his life were marked by the appearance of springs of water.

Becoming a missionary David travelled throughout Wales and Britain and even made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem where he was consecrated bishop. He founded 12 monasteries including Glastonbury and one at Minevia (St. Davids) which he made his bishops seat. He was named Archbishop of Wales at the Synod of Brevi (Llandewi Brefi), Cardiganshire in 550.

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